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Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
10-01-2017, 04:07 PM (This post was last modified: 10-01-2017 04:20 PM by AudiDriver.)
Post: #1
Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
This thread is a copy of what I'm posting on my "home forum" - AudiClubSA.

It's all prior art, so initially I didn't see the point of posting this up on the Forum, although my build is different from some of the others in that I wanted to maintain the OE look of the car while preparing it for trackdays mostly, as opposed to competitive racing. I did initially think that keeping the car OE would cost less, but I can see now in hindsight that I probably ended up spending more by buying a car that was not in bad shape cosmetically and took care of lots of repairs that could have been left alone on a stripped out racer. But this is the journey I decided on, so I'm living with the extra expense (probably around R20k or so in the end).

The car could be focused on participating in gymkhana and trackday events with the aim of improving my track driving skills, having fun, teaching my eldest daughter how to drive properly on a track and a skid pad (i.e. advanced driving skills) and allowing me to do what I enjoy - working on cars while learning some new skills at the same time. If you can use your hands, have access to basic tools, can sacrifice some activities to create time in your busy schedule and know how to research, then embarking on a project such as this can be very fulfilling in more than one way.

I will be doing all the work myself - excluding any specialised work such as the exhaust build when I get to that.

A budget was prepared giving me about R 35k to source a car and about R 65k to attend to repairs (expected on a 20-year old vehicle), neglected maintenance, essential and preventive maintenance and upgrades to brakes and suspension. The order of priorities would be as follows:
1. Source donor car
2. Mechanical repairs
3. Maintenance
4. Upgrade brakes
5. Upgrade suspension, including semis
6. Basic and cheap performance mods (intake etc.)
7. Attend events
8. More suspension mods and upgrades
9. Performance upgrades

A LSD and shorter final drive ratio would be included in 8.

The initial budget would get me to step 7. From thereon things will cost more. Sure if you are patient and if you watch the classifieds, you could pick up a second hand racer for less than R 100k, but then you would have learned nothing, and that is the whole point of this.

So what price to put on the experience gained?

I decided on the E36 328i after seeing what this vehicle is capable of with very basic modifications only (a number of these attended some of the Michelin Cup events and I have befriended one of the owners, whom has been a great source of valuable information so far). The 328i has a bullet proof motor (single vanos straight 6), solid drivetrain and near 50:50 weight distribution, which is a good start. And of course it is RWD.

Because Racecar.

These vehicles are not in abundant supply anymore, and after some searching I picked up this un-abused, although somewhat neglected, example:

[Image: B0D000AD-0A73-4A06-BA56-5850EFDCFA8C_zps6i9jqqlx.jpg]

[Image: 36430617-4E88-4815-BE53-0063A3605A14_zpsvg6srbru.jpg]

I had a look at the usual culprits and also took the car for a DEKRA test before I purchased it to discover potential additional issues - of course knowing about them does not mean one knew exactly what was wrong and what it would cost to repair, so it remains somewhat of a gamble in the end.

And here's a list of things that had to be done as part of the first 4 steps:
Repairs for roadworthiness
a. Replace coolant sensor
b. Replace brake light sensor
c. Repair reverse lights left and right (covers were missing, bulb holders missing, housings damaged)
d. Replace main beams left and right - H1 55W
e. Replace mirrors (one mechanism sticky and one broken)
f. Disconnect and isolate loose wires at bumper
g. Repair left rear window winder mechanism
h. Secure grill
i. Replace wiper blades
j. Replace handbrake shoes

More repairs
a. Replace bonnet struts
b. Source and install covers for tail lights
c. Replace door trim right rear
d. Replace fuel pump (noisy)
e. Source and install cover for Jacking Point
f. Source and install fender liner L Front
g. Source and install fender liner R Front
h. Source and install fender cover Right
i. Source and install door handle covering Left
j. Door trim piece driver
k. Refurbish alternator (noisy bearing)
l. Replace gearshift bushes
m. Replace gearshift rubber boot
n. Replace Exhaust Manifold (rear)
o. Replace driver's door rubber seal
p. Replace radiator (it had a leak)
q. Install ambient sensor (missing)
r. Replace thermostat (also replace the OE composite housing with an aluminium one)
s. Replace water pump (preventive maintenance)
t. Replace vanos seals (symptom: low torque < 3000rpm)

Basic Maintenance
a. Replace oil – Engine (5W-40 Synthetic)
b. Replace oil – Differential (Redline ATF D4)
c. Replace oil – Transmission (Redline 75W-90)
d. Fuel Filter
e. Ribbed Belt
f. Oil filter
g. Motul RBF660 Brake Fluid - 5 tins
h. Spark Plugs – OEM

Cosmetic
a. Repaint right rear and right front fenders
b. Repair left front door
c. Remove dents
d. Replace front bumper (aftermarket M-sport) and paint
e. Repaint mirrors
f. Polish car

I also had to take care of some really stupid things like broken panel clips:

Clip with missing tab - what idiot...?

[Image: F5F1461C-758A-4487-8A34-8C6A2552462F_zpsprjrzrua.jpg]

Replaced with steel tab using some pratley glue...

[Image: C0E11AF2-AC87-4F76-927D-34CE93E4ABEE_zpsgu35wpes.jpg]

[Image: AC63A426-9118-496F-95F3-A9D14032641E_zpszesa2pvj.jpg]

[Image: 49CA1315-B314-4964-B7C2-6BD7B6A59F68_zpsro4yruhb.jpg]

Here's how to replace diff and transmission fluid without making a mess:

Some rubber hose that goes to the bottom of the bottle, sealed at the top with some insulation tape:

[Image: 3005D273-1849-4C37-8177-C798E2DD0060_zpsmuium9st.jpg]

Make a small hole:

[Image: 15D4F117-759D-46AF-9098-A5A44587EFFC_zpsx2nwi47d.jpg]

A mechanic must own a compressor:

[Image: 4784300B-244F-4EF4-A201-60DCDDF74629_zpsojiyeuhq.jpg]

Set the pressure to about 0.5 Bar and insert the end of the hose into the filler hole before adding compressed air to the hole in the bottle:

[Image: 9B12C808-0FD4-4735-9F4A-D62653E3DF85_zpstt1kwpgo.jpg]

This transfers all the oil from the bottle to the diff in a few seconds without making a mess.

Although things didn't happen in exactly this sequence, having these taken care of it was time for some upgrades...

First-up were the brakes. I sourced some new brake discs for the rear, heat treated and slotted by Vari, and added some EBC Blue pads.

For the front I decided to upgrade to E46 330i brakes (325mm dia compared to 286mm dia of the stock brakes). I sourced the discs from Vari - heat treated and slotted - and the calipers from a scrap yard. I am going with EBC yellow stuff for now. EBC isn't the best, but they make a decent pad that works well with these cars and they do not eat discs or cost an arm and a leg. I tried to source Ferodo DS2500 which many guys recommend, but they are impossible to find. I will be using some Brembo pads after these though to compare them, as they are in the same price bracket.

I love the Endless pads (ME020 and ME22), but they're just too expensive (more than twice the price of the EBC).

New brake disc vs the old one:

[Image: 7D38D1C4-F2C6-4E1F-873A-A45577B38BD8_zpsruosnynm.jpg]

[Image: 2F47B531-EEAB-461B-B6A2-2F9B581D631A_zpswmxudvt1.jpg]

[Image: 507C7D26-E17A-48B0-9905-701E4EE8C9B3_zpsagpgy6i5.jpg]

With the brake fluid replaced and new brakes fitted, I took the car to its first outing at Zwartkops for a gymkhana event organised by one of the members of SOCCSA. This was lots of fun and also confirmed that the suspension was tired and needed to be upgraded soon. So I ordered a BC Racing BR type RA suspension kit for the car (following much deliberation and comparison between options, their service was the best...

[Image: 6109ECE6-E257-434A-861D-A0C5A42F7D3E_zpsuo3ao4hs.jpg]

The BC suspension is adjustable for damping and ride height while it also includes camber plates for the front. These arrive tomorrow...

Seeing that the new suspension would lower the car and require correcting the camber at the rear and castor up front, I opted for some goodies from Powerflex as an early start to replacing the suspension bushes for improved stiffness and handling:

[Image: C6F6ABAA-B140-49B4-A02E-40ACA50F0328_zpslio7ynb4.jpg]

[Image: 3845855D-5BD5-4C36-A6AE-D069348D92C5_zpslwabrail.jpg]

[Image: 4C8A69BE-7ABB-4B1C-9242-BE7731BC1627_zpsmzknw43e.jpg]

With regards the alignment I settled at about 325mm front and 305mm at the rear, with near 3 deg camber front, 2.5 deg camber rear, 0 toe front and 0.20 toe rear. I'm using around 20 to 24 clicks out for street and between 8 and 12 clicks out for the track.

I'm using the Black Series bushes as they're harder and more track oriented than the blue ones.

Next-up it was time to get rid of the stock airbox and add a custom intake:

[Image: 64C04083-55BF-45B3-86E8-59DAFCD2F0CF_zpsotvgiq58.jpg]

Besides improving breathing, the car now had a sporty and throaty intake noise to compliment the sweet 6-pot motor.

I added the M3 strut reinforcement plates for the front towers from BMW - (they fit E46 also):

[Image: suspension_e36_strutplate_lg.jpg]

And some reinforcement plates supplied by Axis for the rear towers.
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10-01-2017, 04:24 PM (This post was last modified: 10-01-2017 04:26 PM by Lizzard.)
Post: #2
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
This is epic Blowheart Blowheart

This car is going to be as new when you are done with it, except for the motor it is like you are replacing everything
Love the airbox idea, was brilliant. You must put a diy on it for us and post

Current: 2005 E90 330i manual - Black Sapphire Metallic (475)

Ex's:
1994 - E36 316i modified
2001 - E46 330i auto

[Image: 330i fuel consumption_3194366856.jpg]
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10-01-2017, 04:25 PM (This post was last modified: 10-01-2017 05:24 PM by AudiDriver.)
Post: #3
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Next I replaced the Vanos seals and at the same time attended to a new thermostat and water pump.

The thermostat was replaced because the car did not warm up properly. It turned out it didn't have a thermostat installed. Hammerhead

The waterpump was replaced as preventive maintenance - the pump installed was the original BMW unit with a composite impeller. It was still in good condition with very little play on the bearing. The new unit is a HEPU pump with metal impeller.

Original Pump:

[Image: AA2EB349-1C0F-4879-ADC1-C22C98EEF137_zpsvdmsn3hi.jpg]

We used a drill with wire brush to clean the areas in the engine block. These cars are prone to galvanic corrosion behind the thermostat - I was relieved to find very little evidence of that.

Thermostat, waterpump and vanos removed:

[Image: 909EC218-79BC-4135-A32D-F87682E6EEE5_zps1mueahnh.jpg]

I tapped the old pump with a hammer while jacking it off with two 6mm bolts. This worked a charm and it was out in no time at all.

The OE plastic thermostat housing was replaced with a metal one from Goldwagen at the same time.

Onto Vanos I found the cam timing to be incorrectly adjusted. Notice the locking blocks not sitting flush due to incorrect intake cam timing:

[Image: CA790202-AEF7-4DDF-8742-E70DAEDC9FA2_zpsvhs0hbae.jpg]

Test drive shows the car gets up to temperature within a few minutes now. And lost power had been restored.

I had two small setbacks with this job. Firstly I needed to go buy a 24 open end spanner to rotate the cams - I was hoping a shifting would fit the cams but it is too wide. Secondly when I pulled the car out for testdrive it pissed oil all over the driveway. Turned out the seal rings BMW gave me for the vanos oil pipe were the incorrect size - I noticed they were a rattle fit when I installed them but didn't think much of it at the time. It didn't leak while idling, only under load, so we didn't notice this when checking the car for leaks earlier.

So I dug the old ones out of the rubbish bin and installed them - fixed.

Next I decided to take another step towards weight reduction...by ripping out the part that stops you from dropping the clutch on this car...as many have done before me...

This is the parts diagram for the E36 328i clutch - I have circled the part in red:

[Image: 67E149CF-4AA3-4D1A-BB9C-9C4DA230CB1D_zps514twfg7.jpg]

It doesn't really sit there...it actually sits between between the steel pipe and the rubber pipe a little further back from the clutch slave cylinder.

BMW calls it a "lock valve". The BMW community calls it a CDV - clutch delay valve. I call it a POS. I have heard someone call it the seed of the devil, which I think is apt.

Basically it acts like a check valve with restricted flow in one direction as opposed to no flow. It allows rapid flow of fluid to the slave cylinder, but it restricts the rate at which fluid flows in the other direction. It accomplishes this by having a spring acting on a small disc that has a small hole in it. When you press the clutch the fluid compresses the spring and fluid flows around the disc. When you release the clutch the spring presses the disc against a seat and the fluid can only flow through a small hole in the disc - which means that the release action of the clutch is restricted - or delayed.

The effect is that when you drop the clutch, it stops the friction plate from biting, instead letting it drag on the flywheel at a rate that BMW designed into the delay valve. So no rapid getaways with this car. It also makes for stupidly slow shifts, especially from first to second. I believe it is supposed to protect the driveline against idiots, but if you know how to drive then it is an annoying POS.

Some companies sell a modified part, but I don't see the point in that - it can simply be removed.

Here are some picks of POS:

[Image: 2D4A8F56-FC2C-4EC3-9F1D-D1F53E933F0B_zpsrrqfuxlf.jpg]

[Image: EAB5E171-BF5E-4F38-8EFD-0BF5DCBCE0A8_zpsqrjcdntp.jpg]

[Image: 004059E9-967C-4239-818D-DDE9F5EA9C75_zpshojagwf2.jpg]

Notice the tiny hole on the inside restricting fluid flow in the reverse direction.

DIY fog light blanks were fitted yesterday - looks better than the empty cavities:

[Image: 4126FAA3-2126-4491-8463-3DA63DB60EAF_zpsgoejqccd.jpg]

I have since bought a pair of second hand ones from Gizmo, which I need to restore and fit.

I added this harness (Schroth Quick Fit, sold by ATS) which fits the OE seatbelt brackets. It's probably the only 4-point harness suitable/approved for a car with stock interior. I'm still looking for a set of M3 front seats to go with these, maintaining everyday drivability but adding some extra support for the track.

[Image: quickfit_installation_graphic_b.jpg]

Refurbished steering wheel from Speedline:

[Image: 8337025A-DDFF-4249-83E5-B2062350B39E_zpsgc0kpobn.jpg]

[Image: 4FA872E5-035F-4498-AB36-2181E5AC62ED_zpspzin5ksl.jpg]

Following the long awaited delivery of the suspension, the BC Racing BR type RA coil-overs were fitted. This included:
1. Front coilovers
2. Rear damper and spring
3. Offset lower control arm bushes (powerflex) front
4. Lower control arms (powerflex) rear

Fronts:
Fitting the fronts are quite straight-forward. The camber plates gave me about -2.5 deg camber either side - I can still add spacers - which came supplied - to the strut mounts to increase this by about 1 deg if necessary. I was hoping for -3 deg, but this is fine for a start. I didn't go ultra low - about 1.5 inch lower than stock. Both sides are about 570mm measured as described in the manual (bottom of fender to bottom of wheel rim - 17"). Stock is around 600mm on standard suspension, but laden. M3 is about 560mm unladen for reference. so this is about 10mm higher than E36 M3.

I used 4mm preload on the springs.

Setting ride height is a straight-forward affair. I went 20mm higher than the factory settings which the coilovers came with.

I hacked my thumb during removal of the lower control arm bushes - luckily I'm not a bleeder. Caster is about +3.5 deg following fitment of the offset bushes. Stock is more-or-less zero. Increasing caster (more positive) has the effect of making the car more stable in a straight line (increased high-speed stability at the expense of more steering effort). Offset bushes are used on pre-19956 E36 M3 for increased caster - for reasons stated - the latter years had a change in the geometry of the housing which resulted in the same caster for a centred bush.

Rears:
Fitting the rears were more involved. The drive axle had to be loosened at the diff to get the wishbone to drop low enough to get the old spring out. Setting preload on the new springs was also an issue: the spring would start to compress long before completely seated. If zaero preload was taken as the position where it started to compress, then the damper had to be adjusted to its tallest setting. Clearly this was wrong and would cause the suspension to bottom out. I then decided to take zero preload as the position where the bottom mount was touching right around the spring perch. Comparing this to the factory settings it made sense - I then used the factory settings for matching the damper length with the spring top perch height. I went 5mm higher than the factory settings following my initial checks. this gave me about 550mm to 555mm ride height at the rear - about 5mm to 10mm higher than the factory settings for the M3.

The car is standing somewhat nose down - looks quite racer with this stance. Following adjustment of rear camber there is zero rubbing and it seems happy at about -2.5deg camber at the rear.

Rear camber adjustment now comes easily and precisely via the new lower control arms. Fitting these required loosening of the diff to provide clearance to remove the inner bolts that hols the arms in place. This needed some head scratching and a quick youtube search to confirm the strategy.

I started damping settings at the factory 8 clicks out from fully hard. This was too hard for daily driving. I'm now running 12 out at the front and 16 out at the rear. This seems spot on - firm but not harsh. I'll add clicks for the track.

I also added the strut reinforcement plates front and rear. I'm happy with the result - I know for a fact if I had this done by a fitment centre some shortcuts would have been taken.

For what it's worth I spent about 16 hours on this job. I had an extra pair of hands for the first 7 of these. I also had to buy a 12 torx socket to remove the drive shaft bolts - this required a visit to Builders on the Sat. They ripped me off properly again.

But I avoided buying anything else - went straight to the sockets and straight out. The Devil did make me buy 10, 11 and 14 torx as well though...

Longdrop went to Zwartkops for its first track session the weekend of 21 Aug 2016. I got some 25 laps in with zero issues.

I used 3rd and 4th gears only, shifting mostly before 5500 rpm, not gunning for time but trying to carry as much corner speed as possible. The highest speed I managed on the back straight was about 145 kph - there is definitely room to push harder. A shorter diff ratio would also suit this track better.

The car was shod with some second hand Bridgestone Potenza RE-11S semi-slicks. These were so awesome - not giving away any traction, no squealing or noise, just grip and more grip.

The car handled neutrally with the suspension settings on factory (8 out from fully hard front and rear). I was not aware of any body roll and given that there isn't much torque to speak of traction out of bends was not really any problem. There was some understeer at the very limit of grip - the nose would edge wide under these circumstances - still very predictable and controllable.

The brakes managed fine with no fade in any of the sessions. I still need to add the brake cooling ducts though. So I'm quite happy that they withstood the abuse without signs of weakness.

Coming off the track on the last session I heard clunk in the rear suspension. It wasn't a noise I was familiar with, so I checked it out. It turned out the lower shock mounting bolt had come loose - almost totally - which allowed the shock bush to shift about, causing the clunk. I'm very relieved that the bolt didn't lose on the track. This is prayer for you. I definitely need spring washers there.

Unfortunately I forgot my dashcam at home, so I only have my Harry's lap sessions as proof. I ended up consistently running between 1.22 and 1.23 by the last session of the day.

This car handles a lot better than any of my Audis around the track. Not bad for a 20-year old mill.

What I did found interesting were the white deposits in the exhaust after driving the car hard around the track:

[Image: 83F4CCCF-7B7D-4327-BDD8-6C30266566F2_zpsz2xndx18.jpg]

Next move was to add an M3 oil filter housing and oil cooler. I managed to source the parts from a guy that was breaking up his M3 motor.

Fitting the oil filter housing to the M52 motor isn't a straight forward swap though; the following must be done to make the filter housing from the S50 motor fit to the M52 motor:
1. The tensioner mechanism from the standard housing must be transferred to the M3 housing - it is a straight swap though;
2. The power steering pump on the M52 motor is different to the one on the S50 motor - it requires 2 x 22mm dia x 16.6mm long spacers with 8.5mm dia holes in the centre to align the powersteering pump pulley with the drive belt. The one bolt hole is also not drilled through on the S50 housing and tapped inside the body - on the M50 the bolt screws into a nut as part of another bracket suspending the power steering pump. I just drilled this through to accommodate fitting;
3. The oil line to the vanos needs to be fitted to the S50 housing where the oil temperature sensor used to sit (the M52 motor does not display oil temperature). The banjo bolt for the line is M14 x 1.5 while the sensor hole is M12 x 1.5. This requires the hole to be drilled and tapped while also milling the landing to accept the bigger sealing washer for the M14 bolt.

Here's an image of the M3 filter housing, also offered by Turner Motorsport for a similar upgrade:

[Image: 869499_x800.jpg]

[Image: A5264958-BB60-4A3A-9B25-C044FE3B03FA_zpsrjehq4oc.jpg]

[Image: 6EBDF1C0-A87B-4C26-B531-F70E92C2B299_zpsuqtaw42s.jpg]

Here's a picture showing the hole in the housing that needs to be drilled and tapped for M14 banjo bolt:

[Image: E312737B-E109-4285-A468-56C255EBF7E6_zpslywwky5b.jpg]

Modified filter housing and spacers:

[Image: 9E1CBC11-D7C9-4F87-8783-91500E6E0897_zpsuuqjkwcu.jpg]

The oil cooler from the S50 motor fits underneath the standard radiator with some brackets that I made up for this purpose:

[Image: 3BD7B191-A7E6-4D33-9796-819881EFAF23_zpscpxnjoke.jpg]

The oil filter and oil were refreshed at the same time (the oil had seen some track use already).

The modification to the filter housing and the spacer were done for me by a friend with an engineering shop.

I also added the H&R sway bars and a front strut brace as I was getting to the final items on my Phase 2 mod list:

H&R anti-roll bar vs stock front:

[Image: 3E09D2CE-97E3-4D58-8742-2DBA2D5B0BAD_zpswzkhkxfs.jpg]

[Image: 65F1E1CA-2B81-4891-BEE8-C4F5653CC687_zpso3dnvbpl.jpg]

The bushes of the rear links were tired - I replaced them with some new powerflex ones.

The front swaybar bushes were also quite tired and soft:

[Image: 9365D46A-5607-485A-984F-6040DC170B4A_zpseoxsxrco.jpg]

[Image: 99F1AF77-5BC8-494E-B690-0FAB2EBB858A_zps5uklrego.jpg]

I also added one of these at the front, which reduces flex in the towers and make the suspension work together left and right - and it looks cool:

[Image: AA65AE5D-C1E1-4723-BCBB-47B050ACF491_zpsmmk97bpv.jpg]

I bought these wheels (in very good condition) from Gizmo:

[Image: 20160823_180553.jpg]

I added some second hand rubber to them, but they've never been used and I possibly won't get to use them at all (the tyres I have on my daily rims are 205s), so they may go back on sale some time. Unfortunately.

Here are some more pics of the oil filter housing installation.

View from underneath with spacers for pump:

[Image: 7DB04EFC-FB30-4600-A684-45E7CAD57098_zpspwnb2uad.jpg]

Before mounting the pipes to the filter housing - I decided to modify the alternator shroud for the pipes to clear rather than removing it - retaining some of the functionality and OE look:

[Image: 7FA95FD7-9BB7-478B-8197-2AA7FD8A931F_zpsoeqy9c5u.jpg]

Power steering pump spacers installed:

[Image: C6B6DFCA-DC51-41B6-A32E-BC6002631098_zpsycpo9yvu.jpg]

Power steering pump pulley allignment works out fine with the 16.6mm spacers in front:

[Image: D3D77F6C-4707-47D7-BCC3-F1C15F37302C_zpsd54i55e6.jpg]

End:

[Image: 4696FC96-F184-4FC0-8F5F-6AB80A738205_zpsbhtf9hhh.jpg]

Later I replaced the OE hoses with some new hydraulic hoses and fittings.

Fitting the Schroth harness:

[Image: F0536134-D19D-44FB-A21E-3B30A88D6A43_zpsqyghkf5f.jpg]

Modifying the cover slightly to accommodate the fitting:

[Image: D4E12D5B-3ECA-45FF-9E35-EB32ABE0456B_zpsqu18qyf3.jpg]

[Image: 1BBCBD1D-C3BD-40DC-8D98-9BA039BF8A5B_zpsof1oglba.jpg]

Rear bracket bent to fit the centre seat belt restraint:

[Image: 1A52C9D9-6B84-4991-821B-BB5C4D7EB047_zpsrzg1dl81.jpg]

Installed in the rear:

[Image: 6B074CC9-09A6-4B4C-8FF8-7FFA9AED03E8_zpsptndsgdy.jpg]

As far as I now this harness is the only one that works with the standard seat belts and seats of VW / Audi / BMW. I fitted this because sliding around on the seat during hard cornering or braking is annoying and impacts steering inputs and accuracy...and it is tiring. It can also be removed in seconds.

[Image: 787B9B28-FD92-4C16-B24F-A3BB0CFD0282_zpsjkuhpnns.jpg]

And because I was at ATS, I picked up a fire extinguisher that fits in the driver's door panel:

[Image: 21C5A09A-5EE0-4473-880C-6395FD334312_zpsfqgtmtan.jpg]

It fits inside the door storage compartment:

[Image: 7D694A66-08F6-4D07-AF1A-BC2702A358BF_zpsgbuviyrv.jpg]

Notice my excitement:

[Image: 6B3F3C72-FCFC-4BF3-BA1F-45191C7F7AF5_zps34e68bjc.jpg]

Finally in November I had the priviledge of attenting a proper track day (organised by BMW Car Club Gauteng) at Kyalami:

[Image: 9C4FDA20-34F4-4261-A797-44E453933F19_zps81olfovn.jpg]

[Image: CE6D7409-30E9-4185-8C9A-45CA1D2F1F48_zpskwermlk0.jpg]

[Image: 2A62C508-706C-4D7B-9A2F-F08BC9587D4B_zpsyw0hakpa.jpg]

I was very slow...my car needs a shorter diff and I need more practice. But it was fun.

A very well organised event. I look forward to next year's.

Carbon clean (the Venom-way) in preparation for M50 manifold conversion:

[Image: 3B22384D-CF68-434C-B600-CB0E09B6F80C_zpsojwiulwk.jpg]

[Image: 01F50C8B-AA4A-40DF-889D-06B3C78DE21B_zpsgbqqsln9.jpg]

Retrofitting bracket for holding the parts:

[Image: 95A54840-B387-4853-A689-F6CAF0AE4987_zpsriagcbpz.jpg]

Throttle-body spacer (to ensure a vacuum-tight seal):

[Image: B6E670A6-DEAB-4881-8919-E7BA7C51DF13_zpsgl5qgpqw.jpg]

M50 manifold installed:

[Image: B790FB00-D780-4330-8DC6-F7889958E246_zpspx19cbr1.jpg]

[Image: BE112959-B7BE-43C7-9AF3-87CE522F4D43_zpssciczgkn.jpg]

It isn't a straight-forward swap, but as long as you're not in a hurry there's no reason why you would require fancy kits or why it shouldn't be within the ability of a DIY-er.

The modifications done thus far seem to work well. Longdrop made a trip to Venom Racing (Witbank) for a dyno run (apparently stock ones make between 95 and 100 kW on this dyno.)

[Image: A1858BE9-6500-41F5-AD47-8A2A945CA7A5_zps3ipipknp.jpg]

Car runs lean at engine speeds below 4000 rpm, and since it has an open loop fueling system (no lambda sensors) the only way to fix this is with chip. Once the A/F has been sorted, the torque at lower rpm will rise a bit (about 10%).

I got around to doing a few outstanding things in the new year. Firstly the sunroof was repaired and serviced (looks like it needed a R 30 part but it cost a handful of cash fortune to have this done by an expert):

[Image: 38021443-87F7-4F6D-861F-7E455CE7F7AA_zps2ki3qlmd.jpg]

[Image: F6D18762-A727-43E2-81C9-2B94D3921BB0_zpshdiwaqqw.jpg]

At least the sunroof headliner turned up...it was stuck inside the roof...

[Image: CCEA9016-155D-4411-A5F8-3CF567DA9182_zpsvvbvgxjj.jpg]

I decided not to delete the sunroof, for the reasons stated earlier. So it needs to work. Even though it is not manly to have a sunroof.

Wearing a helmet around track I will never fully appreciate the benefit of this thing...
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10-01-2017, 05:27 PM (This post was last modified: 10-01-2017 05:32 PM by AudiDriver.)
Post: #4
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
The cardboard panels underneath my boot liner were a bit tired, and because I had removed the spare and not fitted that plastic thingy on top, the stupid thing kept on collapsing when I loaded stuff into the boot.

So I got a piece of 5mm perspex 740 x 680 mm from a place in Randburg and cut / trimmed it to fit the recess on top of the wheel well.

[Image: 6FA4048F-990F-4710-A100-7B43556BF133_zpsrp1qgruy.jpg]

[Image: E9051E9D-DCB6-450E-85DF-69E72978EFCB_zps2dne8uky.jpg]

The tired cardboard panels:

[Image: A448D8DD-F315-4424-A50B-8C8170FC5D6D_zpsjcczh5ln.jpg]

[Image: 44C824B3-80CA-4A23-8BC3-9353C11D48B2_zps0xn0abze.jpg]

The stock seat weighs 24 kg. A bucket seat by comparison weighs between 8.5 and 10.5 kg. Replacing the two front seats with two bucket seats and custom rails should save around 25 to 28 kg. Considering a passenger in the car is worth a penalty of around 1.5s per lap at Zwartkops, throwing out the OE seats should be worth around 0.5s per lap.

But I'm not doing that now.

Instead I had the old tattered seat refurbished at MC Auto Trimmers in Randburg. They did a sterling job at bringing it back to life.

[Image: 70AB43DF-0887-45EE-AEEF-456DE37C3AB0_zpsj3erfglj.jpg]

[Image: A159C7B3-C1BB-4FBC-AEC0-80B0B8115B84_zpst7i646mo.jpg]

Hopefully, at least for some time, the next upgrade will be the last for a while (car still has OE exhaust...that isn't right I know).

I picked up a 3.46 ratio unit (type 188 diff) from Bemows on Friday afternoon...

[Image: 42CB545F-1C29-475A-AD98-B03C8F6F3B5E_zpszrcrhcn1.jpg]

Next it will be going for LS conversion before I fit this with some new powerflex bushes for the diff and subframe.

I will probably refresh the rear trailing arm bushes (with OE units) while I'm down there.

The standard diff is 2.93 - so this is about 20% shorter and should make a good difference out on the track.

I'm shopping around for the LS conversion at the moment. I did look at Quaife as well, but the price is very dear (between R16k and R 21k, depending whether you import it yourself or buy from agents).

So it will be a conventional clutch LS unit that goes in.
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10-01-2017, 05:50 PM
Post: #5
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Awesome Clapper
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10-01-2017, 06:48 PM
Post: #6
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Fulfilling no doubt! Awesome work, hope you keep sharing your progress Praise
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10-01-2017, 09:13 PM
Post: #7
Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Dig it more updates please !!!


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E36 V8 Turbo Drift Missile Build in progress
http://www.bmwfanatics.co.za/showthread.php?tid=65639
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10-01-2017, 11:39 PM
Post: #8
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
So much work, Clapper

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11-01-2017, 07:58 AM
Post: #9
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
ClapperClapperClapper

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Current: E90 335i N54 A/T a.k.a Pr1nc3ss
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11-01-2017, 08:12 AM
Post: #10
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Epic build, well done. I like that compressor trick ClapperPraise


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11-01-2017, 08:28 AM
Post: #11
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Awesome Praise
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11-01-2017, 09:11 AM
Post: #12
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Wow, thats alot of work put in already. Somehow i think it needs just a little more than the below.
Quote:If you can use your hands, have access to basic tools, can sacrifice some activities to create time in your busy schedule and know how to research, then embarking on a project such as this can be very fulfilling in more than one way.


I like to think I am able to use my hands and have access to basic tools, but doubt i will be able to do what you have lol.Rollsmile

No, no, he didn’t slam you, he didn’t bump you, he didn’t nudge you… he *rubbed* you. And rubbin, son, is racin’. – Harry Hogge, Days of Thunder

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11-01-2017, 09:14 AM
Post: #13
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
WOW man, this looks EPIC!

Love the work done thus far on the car, reminds me that I need to go update my e46 track/everyday thread also, I have some new info and videos to share, not as much work done as you have accomplished.
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11-01-2017, 11:49 AM
Post: #14
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Brilliant stuff!! You will love the 3.46 diff around the track. Really gives a nice grunt when needed compared to the lazy 2.93.

Big ups for all the fabrication!!

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11-01-2017, 10:10 PM
Post: #15
Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Thanks for the feedback and comments. I'll update once I have this diff back and ready to be installed.

Pricing on powerflex bushes meanwhile is shocking...
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11-01-2017, 11:27 PM
Post: #16
Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
(11-01-2017 10:10 PM)AudiDriver Wrote:  Thanks for the feedback and comments. I'll update once I have this diff back and ready to be installed.

Pricing on powerflex bushes meanwhile is shocking...


What bushes do you want. You can get them made locally for a fraction of the price


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12-01-2017, 09:28 AM
Post: #17
Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Hi Captain. I read your thread on this. I want to replace the diff and sub frame bushes while I'm busy with this upgrade. It is such a PITA job to do when you don't have a lift that I don't want to ever have to go back to them.

A set of diff and subframe bushes is now nearly R7k. The amount is not justifiable in my opinion.

I have access to a guy who supplies specialised polyurethane moulds for some of our ball mills so I suppose it is an option to go to him.

What do you recommend?


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12-01-2017, 01:39 PM
Post: #18
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
(12-01-2017 09:28 AM)AudiDriver Wrote:  Hi Captain. I read your thread on this. I want to replace the diff and sub frame bushes while I'm busy with this upgrade. It is such a PITA job to do when you don't have a lift that I don't want to ever have to go back to them.

A set of diff and subframe bushes is now nearly R7k. The amount is not justifiable in my opinion.

I have access to a guy who supplies specialised polyurethane moulds for some of our ball mills so I suppose it is an option to go to him.

What do you recommend?


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Hi buddy

There is a place called golden spring works that can make any poly bush you want and for cheap (look at my thread the orange bushes on the rear adjustable arms and they charged me just over R200 for both). Or ztorm racing can make you solid alum bushings which are cheaper than the powerflex ones.

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http://www.bmwfanatics.co.za/showthread.php?tid=65639
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12-01-2017, 02:13 PM
Post: #19
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
Epic build. Well-done Clapper

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12-01-2017, 03:14 PM
Post: #20
RE: Longdrop E36 328i Track Car
(12-01-2017 09:28 AM)AudiDriver Wrote:  Hi Captain. I read your thread on this. I want to replace the diff and sub frame bushes while I'm busy with this upgrade. It is such a PITA job to do when you don't have a lift that I don't want to ever have to go back to them.

A set of diff and subframe bushes is now nearly R7k. The amount is not justifiable in my opinion.

I have access to a guy who supplies specialised polyurethane moulds for some of our ball mills so I suppose it is an option to go to him.

What do you recommend?


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Is that the price through moranor@axis?


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